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BIM Academic Forum

Posted on: 2 December 2012
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Filed under: Events

For all it’s good intentions, The BIM Academic Forum (BAF) is struggling to realise it’s very real potential to be a significant force for good.

BAF is a fledging organisation that has brought academics from a plethora of Built Environment Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to integrate Building Information Modeling (BIM) into the curricula.  BIM is causing all HEI’s to review what is happening in industry and understand what implications this will have on their courses.
BAF held its third meeting at the University of Salford on Monday 26th November with attendance from different HEI’s.  The initial part of the meeting was an update from David Philp on the BIM task group work followed by David Cracknell providing an overview on progress of the Education and Training working party. Both Davids acknowledged the importance of BAF in bringing HEIs together and facilitating the significant challenges of education and training of BIM to wider the built environment community. The afternoon session revolved around how HEI’s should establishing high level learning outcomes involving BIM.
There is a general consensus that it is useful and beneficial for HEI’s to liaise with each other, whether it’s on BIM or other issues.  The discussions on BIM invariably acknowledge that the issues involved in integrating BIM into  the curricula are bigger than just BIM.  These issues include wider industry concerns such as a common way of working; the fragmented nature of the industry; the silo-mentality with implications on the approach to teaching and learning in the built environment as well as academic interaction with industry.
So whilst BIM may be the catalyst for further discussion, the question remains whether BAF is the appropriate place for such issues to be addressed and if so, how should it proceed?

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