Events

7 minutes and 46 Seconds: Strategic Response and Contemporary Collecting, Wednesday 17 March, 4pm

Join us for a key event in our ‘Creativity’ month where we welcome Aaron Bryant, Curator of Photography, Visual Culture, and Contemporary History and Barby Asante, artist, curator, researcher and healer in training

7 minutes and 46 Seconds: Strategic Response and Contemporary Collecting

On May 25 of last year, Minneapolis police officers detained George Floyd, after an employee at a convenience store called 911, alleging that Mr. Floyd purchased cigarettes with a counterfeit bill. Seventeen minutes after the first officers arrived, George Floyd was unconscious, and showing no signs of life. As reported by Minneapolis prosecutors, for 7 minutes and 46 seconds, Mr. Floyd suffocated. His neck and breathing were constricted by the knee of one of the arresting officers, and that moment changed the course of history. Through the use of visual culture, this discussion will position Black Lives Matter protests from summer of 2020 within a larger historical context.

The talk will be followed by a Q&A session.

For more information and to book your place, please visit here

 

Music: The Black Experience, Monday 22 March, 5pm

Join us for another key event in our ‘Creativity’ month where we welcome a panel of UK music artists to discuss: Music: The Black Experience.

This event will explore Black artists and executives in the music industry and their personal experiences in both the US and UK market.

The guests will discuss major key points such Marginalisation, breaking through glass ceilings, creative boundaries and discuss significant labels in the industry such as ‘Black or Urban’ & ‘Pop or R’n’B.

Join us as we break down and put together the Black Music Experience.

The discussion will be followed by a Q&A session.

For more information and to book your place, please visit here

Film Screening: Chocolate Babies, Wednesday 21 April, 6pm

Please join us for a key event in our  ‘Gender and Sexuality in Black People’ month, where we are pleased to screen ‘Chocolate Babies’

In 1997 Stephen Winter released his debut film, Chocolate Babies, a vibrant, political, funny and heart-breaking film about activism and the AIDS epidemic. In Winter’s film a group of “black faggots with a political agenda” take on a group of conservative New York politicians in a battle for AIDS treatment.

Filmmaker Rabz Lansiquot will introduce the film – sharing what makes Chocolate Babies such an important piece of work and what it means to them as a filmmaker.

After the film you are welcome to join Rabz for a discussion on the film and to ask questions.

For more information and to book your place please visit here

Black Queer Fictions and Selves, Thursday 29 April, 5pm

Join us for another event in our ‘Gender and Sexuality’ month where we welcome Shantal Edwards, Paul Mendez and Michael Donkor to discuss queer fiction

As part of the University of Westminster’s Black History Year and the School of Humanities New Writing Festival, Paul Mendez and Michael Donkor join Shantel Edwards (Birmingham Literary Festival/Writing West Midlands) to discuss their work. Here they’ll reflect on the pleasures and challenges of writing Black queer fictions and selves, as well as taking questions from the audience.

In the past two years, Paul Mendez’s novel, Rainbow Milk (2020), and Michael Donkor’s novel, Hold (2018), have both brilliantly interrogated the intricacies of Black queer lives. In these novels, both authors give their readers vibrant young protagonists who are coming into an understanding of themselves, their desires and the worlds around them.

The discussion will be followed by a Q&A session

For more information and to book your place, please visit here

 

Mental Health in Black Men, Monday 7 June, 2pm

Join us for a key event in our ‘Wellbeing and Mental Health in Black People’ month where we welcome  Dr Jason Arday and Professor Damien Ridge to discuss ‘Mental Health in Black Men’.

This talk will address the struggles for Black men dealing with mental health, the process of care that is involved with their treatment and the support services available whilst also focusing on empowering Black men to resume control over their mental health following a breakdown or period of ill health.

Jason and Damien will each present a short talk on their research and experiences with ‘Mental Health in Black Men’ and then come together in a discussion around the matters that emerge.

This will be followed by audience questions, which you can send in advance to blackhistoryyear@westminster.ac.uk or ask during the event.

The talk will be followed by a Q&A session.

For more information and to book your place, please visit here

Confronting my Imposter, Monday 14 June, 1pm

Join us for a key event in our ‘Wellbeing and Mental Health in Black People’ month where we welcome Rhoda Quist.

Rhoda will be shedding light on Imposter Phenomenon (internal experience where you believe you are not as competent as others perceive you to be) and how it affects individuals especially from BME backgrounds. Hear from Rhoda’s experiences and her journey with still confronting her Imposter and how she has been successfully tackling these feelings head on in the workplace.

The talk will be followed by a Q&A session.

For more information and to book your place, please visit here

BHY Event: Business & Organisations: An Intersectional Approach

BHY Event: England’s History is Our History

Shirley J. Thompson OBE

Westminster Alumna Kaylee Golding E4 Academy

Westminster graduate Bree Runway

 
 
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