Westminster Law School blog

Visit the website of Westminster Law School

More information about courses in undergraduate law

More information about courses in postgraduate law

Lana Rukavina’s experience on the International Commercial Law LLM 

Posted on: 3 October 2017
By:
No Comments »
Filed under: Alumni - LLM in International and Commercial Law, Law

Lana Rukavina, graduated from the International Commercial Law LLM 

I chose Westminster as the place to study for my Masters because I liked the curriculum and the broad range of modules to choose from, which allowed me to completely tailor the course to my specific interests. Furthermore, it’s great that Westminster Law School is in central London, and the various student halls in the area provide the opportunity to live in one of the greatest cities in the world. There are also extensive funding opportunities, and the scholarship I received held an important place in my overall student experience.

The University and the course definitely lived up to my expectations. The way that lectures and seminars were delivered, the interactive classes, the wealth of social and educational activities, the support for international students, classmates from all over the world, teachers who were very enthusiastic about what they did and brought that enthusiasm into the classroom – all these experiences made my University days exciting, both in terms of the knowledge I gained and the people I met.

I could not praise the lecturers and tutors more. They were very supportive, not only with our coursework and exams, but they were also at hand to discuss any future law career predicaments. Their friendliness often made me feel like they were my peers, rather than superiors I ought to be afraid of. I still keep in touch and even meet up for coffee with some of them, as I still live in London.

One of the best things about the course was the executive weekend full of interesting lectures and networking opportunities in a beautiful English countryside hotel. Moreover, I loved the fact that in order to complete their tasks, students were often required to undertake a lot of research and engage their minds creatively, rather than being given large amounts of dry information to remember.

The social life at Westminster was great. The Welcome Week organised at the beginning of the course enabled international students to learn everything that they needed to know about their new country, while allowing them to socialise in a relaxed setting (spending a day in Brighton, experiencing a Thames boat cruise and, in my case, embarrassing myself singing karaoke). There were numerous events organised by the students for the students throughout the year; I attended both a pub crawl along the Thames and an interesting tax avoidance lecture by prominent speakers, so there was something for everyone.

The best thing about being a Masters student in London is the fact that you are living in a great cosmopolitan city full of endless possibilities. There is always something going on and so much to choose from – West End theatres, art cinemas, free museums, year-round festivals, career and sporting events… it is a cultural melting pot in which you will thrive, meet people from all over the world and, whatever quirky interests you might have, you can be sure to find a place for yourself.

Since I graduated I have been working in a City law firm in the white collar crime area. The course made me think more clearly about what I like and want to do in my future career. It has given me an insight into areas of law I knew nothing about previously, and made my CV much more attractive to prospective employers. The Careers Office at the University was also tremendously helpful in making decisions about my future career plans, writing CVs and cover letters, and even helping me out with mock interviews when I found myself lost preparing for the real ones. The support I received from them was simply amazing.

Nothing I can say would prepare other international students for the immense possibilities that will open up in front of them while doing an LLM at the University of Westminster. What I can say is this: do not think twice about the LLM offer you are made, go open minded, make a good use of all the University support that is on offer, and enjoy your time at Westminster. I wish I could relive it again.

Emina Zahirovic. LLM in International Law at the University of Westminster

Posted on: 3 October 2017
By:
No Comments »
Filed under: Alumni - LLM in International Law, Law

Emina Zahirovic completed her LLM in International Law at the University of Westminster, and  joined international legal firm BDK Advokati/Attorneys at Law at its Banja Luka office in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Emina got a scholarship to Westminster, graduating in November 2013.  She looks back to her time living and studying with other students which she remembers as one of the best experiences of her life. 

When I was looking for a masters course I was looking for specific modules that I wanted to study – international human rights law, and humanitarian law – and when I was comparing universities in London, Westminster was the only one which offered both of these modules on the one course, so it was the best option for me.

I looked at the ratings, the teaching profiles, the facilities and all the other things that Westminster offered, and it all looked good, but it was the course content which was the most important for me; I didn’t want to settle for something else, I really wanted to study those modules.

It was my first time studying in the UK, and both the location and the University really lived up to my expectations. Because the University is based in central London it’s easy to get to know the city. And everyone is really helpful at Westminster – starting from the School registry to the professors and the staff, everyone is there to help you out. We were all international students, and we were struggling a little bit with our English at the beginning, but everyone helped us out.

The way we were taught, and the way we were able to study, was one of the highlights of the course for me. Here in Bosnia the focus is much more on memorising facts and the classical exam styles; at Westminster it was much more about research and original coursework. It definitely taught me how to think, rather than what to think. The people on the course also helped to make it an amazing experience.

I learned so much, and I loved being at Westminster; I had really wanted to study in London for years, so this was a dream come true for me.

The position I’ve taken up now with BDK has more of a focus on corporate and commercial law, which is not quite the area that I was studying for. I thought it might be a problem for me to find a job in a branch of law outside of human rights or humanitarian law, but in the end, studying at the University of Westminster really went in my favour when it came to applying for the post.

I would definitely advise anyone thinking of studying law at Westminster to go for it – the facilities, the libraries and the access to things are amazing. Perhaps the best advice for international students would be to do the short course before you start your LLM, just to get used to the way you need to write, the form, and the legal English you need to know. I think that’s the one thing that could have made a big difference – if I had done the introductory course, I think I would have got even more out of my LLM.

And if you want to make the most of the social life, then live in halls of residence – that was also one of the best experiences of my life. I lived in Wigram House; I made so many friends, it was so easy to get adjusted to London, to overcome that culture shock, and you never feel lonely… it makes me want to go back to London right now!

Ademilola Yerokun graduated (with a Distinction) from the International Law LLM course 

Posted on: 3 October 2017
By:
No Comments »
Filed under: Alumni - LLM in International Law, Law

Ademilola Yerokun graduated (with a Distinction) from the International Law LLM course 

I chose to study at Westminster because the website and brochure had a comprehensive explanation of the course details and structure; I knew what I was going into even before I had started the course. The fees were very reasonable and the location was very central and easily accessible for me.

The structure of the course was fantastic. We had seminars which were incorporated into the lectures, and I referred to them as ‘leminars’. This meant that participation was actively encouraged which created a very positive learning environment. The resources including books and teaching facilities that were available to me for the duration of the course were adequate, and my lecturers and tutors were very professional and friendly. I have since returned to Westminster for further studies and I have seen some of my tutors from the LLM and have been able to approach them for a friendly chat.

As a postgraduate course, I was required to do my independent study in order to be able to participate fully in the class. Completing the course with a Distinction affirmed my decision to have a career in Law. Since I graduated I have been working but I am now currently back at the University of Westminster studying the Legal Practice Course on a part-time basis.

The advice I would you give to anyone thinking of studying for their LLM at the University of Westminster is to go for it – you will get value for your money. But make sure you also prepare to work hard and participate in class. This will ultimately be to your advantage when you have to write your essays and exams.

Claudia Scheufler graduated from the International Law LLM

Posted on: 3 October 2017
By:
No Comments »
Filed under: Alumni - LLM in International Law, Law

Claudia Scheufler graduated from the International Law LLM, and now works for Amnesty International, focusing on issues in Syria and Lebanon

I was living in Sydney, Australia, , when I decided to apply for a Masters course and I hardly knew anything about the universities in London or the academic system here. From the various universities I contacted, I found Westminster to be the most helpful and well organised. I then looked up the profiles of the professors that would teach my course and made my decision based on this.

I was not sure what to expect when I applied but before I accepted the offer, I was a little apprehensive about the cost of the course as it was quite significantly cheaper than some of the other universities in London. But looking back, I’m so pleased I completed my course at Westminster; the teaching quality was excellent, the teaching staff were leading professionals in their field and dedicated to bringing out the best in the students, and the course content was well designed and encouraged students to ‘think outside the box’. The facilities of the Law campus are not amazing but completely sufficient.

I found all the lecturers and tutors very helpful, accessible and genuinely interested in helping students to learn to the best of their abilities. My dissertation supervisor in particular was really helpful and assisted me with advice and encouragement through a variety of minor and major moments of panic.

I thoroughly enjoyed all the classes and the readings, which were super interesting and encouraged creative legal thinking. The other students in my class were also great, everyone was dedicated to learning but still fun and sociable, and whenever I had a problem there was always someone around to help out. On the induction day the Dean of the Law School said in his speech that we should look around the room as some of these people would be our friends for life, and I remember thinking ‘yeah, whatever’, but he was actually right.

It’s rather cool to be in London as a Masters student, having a reasonably flexible schedule with time off in the afternoons. There are excellent libraries, so sometimes I enjoyed spending a few hours at the British Library or the LSE library. For international law in particular there are also events taking place at organisations such as Chatham House or the British Institute of International and Comparative Law, and it’s great to be able to attend those and keep up with international law developments. There are also a lot of interesting places around to do internships or volunteering. Most of the galleries and museums in London are free and there are often interesting exhibitions. And of course the university is close to Oxford Street, so there are ample opportunities for shopping. Basically, I have not found anything that I wanted to do and was not able to in London – including, for example, music festivals, joining a surf club and learning how to fence.

During the second half of my Masters I started working in an admin role at Amnesty International. A few months after graduation I moved into an assistant position in their Middle East research department, where I’m still working and which I thoroughly enjoy. Having a solid understanding of public international law really is essential for all aspects of my work, as, in my opinion, it is impossible to successfully campaign against and research human rights violations without understanding the basics of international law. In addition to that, the other units I’ve taken, including research methodology, international humanitarian law and international criminal law, have also proven very helpful in my current role, where I am dealing with conflict and non-conflict related international law violations on a daily basis.

The course has also been a good foundation for the additional academic study that I’ve undertaken after graduating. Last year, I completed a specialised Postgraduate Diploma in International Humanitarian Law, which was easy for me to follow while working full-time as I had already gained a good understanding of the issues around this during my Masters. I have also completed a number of short courses, and I’m currently studying Arabic and French. In short, virtually everything I learned during the course has come in handy at some point.

If I was to give advice to anyone thinking of studying their LLM at the University of Westminster, I think I would quite simply say: “Do it!” Of course I would tell them to also consider general career aspirations, research interests and potential dissertation supervisors, and what they overall hope to gain from their course. If they want to take a year off and party in London, I would not recommend Westminster, as the course did require a lot of work (at least for me). But if they want to learn, then it’s a great place.

Blazej Blasikiewicz graduated from the International Law LLM

Posted on: 3 October 2017
By:
No Comments »
Filed under: Law

Originally I applied to Westminster to study for my Masters in International Economics, because I am an economist and I had already completed my Masters in Economics in Poland; I thought that perhaps I would go on to work as an economist in the City, or in a field related to economics. Then I attended the introductory week before starting the course, and I realised that I had already covered a lot of the subject while studying in Poland, and I didn’t want to do the same thing again. I’m interested in politics so I did consider taking the Diplomatic Studies course, but then I also found the International Law LLM, and when I contacted the course leader he said he would be happy for me to join the course.

That’s one piece of advice I would give to anyone thinking of studying for the LLM at Westminster; go along to the introductory week, and take advantage of the opportunity to find out more about the subjects, talk to the professors and the course leaders. Doing that enables you to make the right decisions about your course and the subjects you will study.

I didn’t really know what to expect when I started the course, as I didn’t know much about international law, but I think Dr Marco Roscini [the International Law LLM Course Leader] is one of the best professors I have had, someone I really respect. The contact generally with lecturers and professors was good, so I was very happy with Westminster, and with the knowledge I gained while I was there. For me, having already done my Bachelors degree and Masters in Poland, I didn’t need to spend so much time studying methodology, and I don’t think that should be a compulsory part of the course for everyone. But other than that, I think the course was excellent.

The location of the University is fantastic, but if I had to pick one highlight from my time at Westminster, I think it would be the way Marco conducted the classes; he was always perfectly prepared, and that really impressed me.

In general the course has prepared me well for my career; with my two degrees, I started an internship in the Hague to set up a dispute resolution facility for international financial markets, called PRIME Finance, and my background in finance and in international law helped me a lot. Now I work part-time at PRIME Finance, and part-time in the international arbitration team at NautaDutilh, one of the biggest Benelux law firms. So my Masters at Westminster helped me immensely, it prepared me and gave me a good background in the subject. I hope in the future to also work more in politics and lobbying, and be able to influence the decision makers, and again I think my degrees will give me a good advantage.

Originally I applied to Westminster to study for my Masters in International Economics, because I am an economist and I had already completed my Masters in Economics in Poland; I thought that perhaps I would go on to work as an economist in the City, or in a field related to economics. Then I attended the introductory week before starting the course, and I realised that I had already covered a lot of the subject while studying in Poland, and I didn’t want to do the same thing again. I’m interested in politics so I did consider taking the Diplomatic Studies course, but then I also found the International Law LLM, and when I contacted the course leader he said he would be happy for me to join the course.

That’s one piece of advice I would give to anyone thinking of studying for the LLM at Westminster; go along to the introductory week, and take advantage of the opportunity to find out more about the subjects, talk to the professors and the course leaders. Doing that enables you to make the right decisions about your course and the subjects you will study.

I didn’t really know what to expect when I started the course, as I didn’t know much about international law, but I think Dr Marco Roscini [the International Law LLM Course Leader] is one of the best professors I have had, someone I really respect. The contact generally with lecturers and professors was good, so I was very happy with Westminster, and with the knowledge I gained while I was there. For me, having already done my Bachelors degree and Masters in Poland, I didn’t need to spend so much time studying methodology, and I don’t think that should be a compulsory part of the course for everyone. But other than that, I think the course was excellent.

The location of the University is fantastic, but if I had to pick one highlight from my time at Westminster, I think it would be the way Marco conducted the classes; he was always perfectly prepared, and that really impressed me.

In general the course has prepared me well for my career; with my two degrees, I started an internship in the Hague to set up a dispute resolution facility for international financial markets, called PRIME Finance, and my background in finance and in international law helped me a lot. Now I work part-time at PRIME Finance, and part-time in the international arbitration team at NautaDutilh, one of the biggest Benelux law firms. So my Masters at Westminster helped me immensely, it prepared me and gave me a good background in the subject. I hope in the future to also work more in politics and lobbying, and be able to influence the decision makers, and again I think my degrees will give me a good advantage.

LLM Students on two-day visit to the Hague

Posted on: 3 March 2017
By:
No Comments »
Filed under: Law

A bonus for LLM students taking the course this year was the opportunity to visit some of the main international institutions in The Hague, during two tightly packed days there in January 2017.  The group of sixteen participating in the trip included students from Bangladesh, Brazil, Bulgaria, China, Italy, Kenya, the Netherlands, Nigeria, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Uganda and the UK.

The surprise of the trip for me was our first stop, the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons.  We had touched on its work in International Humanitarian Law but it was probably the institution with which, as a group, we were least familiar.  The talk from its Senior Legal Officer, Grant Dawson, was excellent and what was striking is the OPCW’s success in backing up a treaty with a verification mechanism which has achieved real results in substantially reducing chemical weapons.

We spent the first afternoon at the Peace Palace, stunning inside and out.  It houses the International Court of Justice, the principal judicial organ of the United Nations, to which states can bring their disputes.  We visited at an exciting time, Costa Rica and Ukraine had just instituted proceedings against Nicaragua and the Russian Federation respectively.

The Permanent Court of Arbitration, also based at the Peace Palace, was established in 1899 as the first global mechanism to facilitate the settlement of inter-state disputes.  We had a talk from one of the Assistant Legal Counsel and it was interesting to hear something of the PCA’s evolution over the years to its position now, offering a flexible framework for arbitration.

Our second day moved focus from state level to individual criminal proceedings and began with the morning at the International Criminal Court. As well as a talk and mini-tour we were able to sit in the Public Gallery and see the early stages of the Prosecution’s presentation of its case in the trial of Dominic Ongwen, alleged Brigade Commander of the Lord’s Resistance Army.  Seeing the process in action added an extra dimension to our studies.  We saw the care the Court takes to protect witnesses and the interventions of the Presiding Judge, Judge Bertram Schmitt, to ensure the Prosecution’s examination did not pre-empt future testimonies.

We crossed town for our final visit, to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.  Matthew Gillett, a Trial Attorney at the Office of the Prosecutor, gave us a fascinating insight both into the history of the Tribunal and the practical challenges he and his colleagues have faced.

All of the institutions we visited offer internships and for anyone who was considering applying it was very useful to see what these might involve.

As a whole, the trip added substantial value to our studies and we appreciated the institutions facilitating our visits and the time given by their staff.  The trip was also a chance to get to know better our fellow students and to have what we all agreed was an amazing time. We are grateful to the Law School and other Westminster staff for supporting the trip.

Monique Law

LL.M International Law student

Find out more about our LLM in International Law here

 

A Talk with Craig Sharpe from Darlington’s Solicitors

Posted on: 28 February 2017
By:
No Comments »
Filed under: Law

Having been to an array of events held by law firms over the 3 years of my undergraduate study, none have quite compared to the personal and down to earth approach taken by Craig Sharpe when providing us with insight into Darlingtons LLP. From my personal experience, I feel as if many undergraduates are likely to be attracted to international firms due to their generous salaries, secondments abroad and fancy glass buildings. Tunnel vision here ultimately leads to many undergraduates overlooking small/mid-sized firm. The events held by regional firms are quite robotic in that they often begin with a short presentation on the overview of the firm, a question and answer panel and some networking. Oh, and let’s not forget the free drinks. The problem with these events is that even though you get to meet and talk to a variety of individuals in the firm, you’re just a face in a crowd of many students and so it can be hard for you to stand out.

What made the event at Darlingtons special was that Craig took a more personal and informal approach. He didn’t give the usual speech on how the legal profession has become very competitive, instead he took us through a journey of his 30 years working in law and gave us a comparison of what he found good and bad about working at big firms and as a lawyer in general.  He then moved on to give us an insight into how he sees the legal profession will evolve to be like in the future and gave us a visual representation of on the number of lawyers who have received there right to practice. The presentation given didn’t just focus on Darlingtons as a firm. It allowed enough information for a general overview of the profession in addition to advice for doing well in an application to a law firm.  Not only did this give some context towards the profession, it also allowed to appreciate the benefit and disadvantages of being a solicitor whether it be in a big or small firm.

The legal profession has stereotypically been labelled as quite mundane and boring but the event held by Darlingtons broke that stereotype. It was a very social and enjoyable presentation with plenty of time for asking questions and enough information to help students to make an informative decision about their steps after university. One thing that would make the talk even better would be to have another member or even a trainee of the firm share their experience as a lawyer so students get a more broader view of the legal profession as well as the firm.

-Aadil Shara, University of Westminster

Samantha Watson and her training contract at Eversheds

Posted on: 25 April 2016
By:
No Comments »
Filed under: Law

Samantha Watson.fw

I chose to study at the University of Westminster because it offers the unique opportunity to study a law degree and the Legal Practice Course in a seamless, four-year course.

I am grateful for the friends that I have made at the University. I feel that studying in the city has given me the opportunity to meet a more diverse range of people from all different walks of life and from different parts of the world. We have shared our experiences – both the high’s and the low’s – and watched as each and every one of us have progressed and discovered which area of law or which career path we wish to go into. There is a real sense of community at the University and the tutors are always there to offer their support and guidance, especially now that we are approaching the final stages.

The thing that I have found the most challenging throughout my degree was drafting coursework to the standard required at undergraduate level. At the start, I struggled to focus my research on the essay title and instead, found myself including irrelevant and unnecessary points. In order to improve on this, I found it helpful to speak to my tutors to discuss my work. I also decided to make use of the legal skills textbooks available in the library, as well as signing up to any tutorial classes for Westlaw or LexisNexis. By seeking help, I was able to identify my weaknesses. I believe that University is about being self-motivated throughout the entirety of the degree and to make the mistakes at this stage so that you can learn from them in the future.

Over the past four years, I have spent a lot of time applying for various positions. Initially, I was not overly picky with where I wanted to be placed; I simply wanted to build on my C.V and gain practical experience. Although I think it is important to show consistency throughout your C.V, I feel that by keeping an open mind about the law firm in which I wanted to be placed, and the sector that I wanted to work in, I was able me to make a well-informed and reasoned decision about my chosen career path. I have gained a wealth of experience in different legal sectors; from local law firms specialising in both private and commercial law, to completing a mini-pupillage in Chambers. For me, it all culminated in my work experience at Eversheds LLP. From the moment I walked through the door, I knew that this was the law firm for me. I decided to apply for a training contract with the firm, and after an emotional and stressful 6-month process, I was delighted to hear that I had been successful in securing a place. What is even better is that, because I am currently studying my LPC, I have been asked to start my training in September 2016, rather than in 2017.

Looking back, I feel that what set me apart from other candidates was my enthusiasm towards working for the firm. I showed a real interest in the work that the firm does and an understanding of the key principles that the firm as a business, and the lawyers as individuals try to uphold. One principle in particular is that Eversheds is renowned for applying its’ innovative flare when it comes to delivering its’ products and services to clients around the world. Knowing this, I made sure to give examples throughout the process of when and how I have demonstrated this characteristic.

Westminster Law Review

Posted on: 12 April 2016
By:
No Comments »
Filed under: Law

Westminster Law School’s interdisciplinary Law Review written by students and graduates from University of Westminster and other universities.

Greece calls in the lawyers again: New PSI claim filed at ICSID

Posted on: 2 October 2015
By:
No Comments »
Filed under: Law, Law Research

All opinions are those of the blog post author and do not represent Westminster Law School or the University of Westminster.

It seems one cannot live without lawyers. As anxiety over the legality of the Greek Private Sector Involvement (PSI) deal was abating, Cyprus Popular Bank (Laiki) filed an investment arbitration claim at the International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) against Greece, claiming billions of euros in compensation for losses suffered in the 2012 Greek bond haircut. Laiki is a known enthusiast for Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) and is involved in another action against Greece, this time for the provision (or lack thereof) of Emergency Liquidity Assistance (ELA) to its Greek subsidiaries during the events of 2012 that led to the resolution of Cyprus’ two biggest banks.

The PSI deal, forming the core of this action, has been a key component of the Greek Bailouts and is equally blamed and celebrated for moving the burden of any potential sovereign default from private hands onto public coffers. The PSI deal worked by offering to swap in early 2012 Greek bonds with new ones of a lesser value, a reduction of 53.5%. Why would anyone, however, voluntarily agree to accept such a significant haircut? Bondholders were offered this choice after Greece enacted retrospective legislation inserting what are known as Collective Action Clauses (CACs) in the bond contracts. Such clauses provide that if the majority of bondholders in any given bond issue vote in favour of accepting the offer, then all bondholders are obligated to participate. CACs in other words make bonds similar to shares in corporations: if the majority of shareholders vote for a resolution, an objecting minority cannot block it. A significant number of bondholders roped into this deal through the operation of CACs sought legal redress arguing that their investments had been forcefully expropriated.

One group protesting the PSI haircut consisted of 7000 small-holders, who joined a class suit against Greece arguing expropriation under the Greek Constitution and violations of Human Rights provisions under the European Convention of Human Rights. These arguments were tested in the Greek Council of State in March 2013. The court found for the Greek government arguing that losses were due to the activation of CACs, not by the state act that retrospectively inserted the CACs and found no violations of Article 1 of the Protocol to the ECHR.

A second challenge to the PSI came at ICSID from a Slovakian bank. Poštová Banka and it Cypriot subsidiary Istrokapital argued that, under the Greece-Slovak Republic and the Cyprus-Greece bilateral investment treaties, they were entitled to compensation for losses they suffered due to the PSI, amounting roughly to half the invested amount of €504m. The Poštová claim was the first challenge under Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) and is similar to the new case brought on behalf of Laiki. The objective of an investment treaty, Poštová argued, was for the signatories to create favourable conditions for investments. As the Treaty offered standards of protection and a mechanism for dispute resolution when those standards were violated, ICSID was the appropriate forum to discuss any claims arising out of PSI. BITs are aimed at encouraging foreign investment and for that reason make a series of binding promises to investors. They may, as a result, offer a more varied menu of options to someone wishing to sue, than mere reliance on domestic constitutional and human rights provisions. ISDS clauses in BITs have faced criticism for offering a parallel legal system that exists beyond the reach of domestic courts. Concerns has been especially pronounced in the context of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) negotiations. Greece prevailed at ICSID as the Tribunal found that for a variety of technical reasons it did not have jurisdiction to hear the Poštová claim. This finding ended the process without an examination of the substantive claims.

Is the Greek PSI deal in danger after this latest challenge? The short answer is yes. It is unlikely that the advisors of Laiki would have brought a claim if they thought that their client will have the same difficulty on jurisdictional grounds that led to failure in Poštová. While Greece won two challenges on the PSI, one in domestic courts and one in ICSID, the Argentine precedent is not a good omen. The Abaclat case, where a number of Italian bondholders sued Argentina, is illustrative of the sort of action that is becoming more common in the Greek context. While the case is still pending, we have a decision on jurisdiction accepting that the claim comes within BIT provisions and can proceed for consideration on the substantive grounds. Is this the sort of answer one should expect in the new case against Greece? Poštová lost on jurisdiction because of the exact wording of the BIT it was relying on. Investors from one of the other states Greece holds BITs with may have better luck. Bondholder BIT arbitrations remain a danger for Greece.

Dr. Ioannis Glinavos: i.glinavos@westminster.ac.uk

[See here for original post]